One of the questions we get asked the most is “how do I get some value out of the training we do back at the office?”  The feedback we get is that people really enjoy getting out of the workplace, learning new stuff and challenging the way they think – but very often that’s where the new thinking stays, out of the office.

And it makes perfect sense.

When you are out of the office, you are relaxed, can open your mind up and consider new ways of doing things.

Once you are back in the office stuff needs to get done and there is a pressure to do things the old way just to clear the backlog, with the idea that the next day you’ll utilize your training and do things differently, but that day never comes.

So how do you bridge the gap between the old way and the new way?

Well, it is too late to think differently back in the office, you need to think ahead, plan how you will think, behave and act differently before you are back at work and sitting at your desk.

Each time you have an ‘aha moment’ in your training session, ask yourself “what does this mean for the way I do things back at the office?”  Create a plan for how you will do things differently so that you can implement the new thinking as soon as you get back to work.

Don’t take the easy option and do things in the old comfortable way.  The sooner you enact your new thinking, the sooner you create real change back at the office.

Lisa

Written by Lisa

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Lisa is a professional thinker dedicated to helping people unlock their innate creativity and to empower them to think differently – for themselves. She is passionate about building innovative cultures and about harnessing and engaging talent to create thinking communities. Lisa holds an MBA, specialising in organisational change and innovation, which forms the nucleus of her work. She relishes opportunities to share the Minds at Work thinking strategies with government bodies, socially responsible corporate, educators, community groups and farmers, helping them to turn their big ideas into realities.